Our risk assessment system is based on the latest scientific and medical knowledge available in the most respected scientific and medical journals.

Please keep in mind that the risk calculation does not cover other than genetic factors. Environmental factors such as smoking, diet, stress, and physical activity play an important role in the development of the disease. In case your risk is low it does not guarantee that you will not have the disease, or in case of high risk, not means you may certainly develop the disease.

Warning! //

BREAST CANCER

 

Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in women. The disorder affects both males and females, but the incidence in males is 100 times lower. The estimated heritability of breast cancer varies from 5% to 10%. Although breast cancer has been studied extensively over recent years, there is little known about the exact causes of this disorder, although they are most likely complex interactions between genetic makeup and environmental factors. There are many options for breast cancer treatment, depending on the type and stage of cancer and overall health condition. Treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiation.
Breast cancer risk factors: Gender (female) / Older age / Family history / Inherited known mutations in genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 / Obesity / Menopausal hormone therapy / Having no children or first child over the age of 35 / Radiation exposure to the chest / Alcohol intake / Smoking / Beginning menopause at an older age / Beginning menstruation before 12 years.

 

LUNG CANCER 

Lung cancer (LC) occurs when cancer cells form in the cells lining the air passages in the lungs. LC remains the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women worldwide. The heritability of lung cancer has been clearly established and account for 8%. The most important environmental factor that causes the LC is exposure to tobacco smoke through both active and passive smoking (85% of all cases). The disease affects women over 60 years twice more than men. To date, quitting smoking has been shown to reduce the risk of LC. Treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted drug therapy.
LC risk factors: Smoking  / Passive smoking  / Exposure to radon gas  / Biomass fuels  / Coal burning  / Exposure to arsenic, asbestos, silica  / Solid fuels while cooking and heating (formaldehyde and benzene) ​ / Gender (female).

COLLERACTAL CANCER

 

Colorectal cancer (CC), also known as colon cancer, occurs when cancer cells form in the tissue of the colon. CC is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide, accounting for 9% of all cancer incidences. It affects men and women equally and is mainly a disease of developed countries. The estimated heritability of CC is 65%. CC survival chance is highly dependent on the stage of diagnosis. CC mostly begins with the formulation of noncancerous clumps of cells, called adenomatous polyps, which may turn to cancer during the latency period. Polyps treatment is one of the most important CC preventions. CC has a lot of environmental risks that can be regulated, helping to prevent cancer.
CC risk factors: Older age  / Adenomatous polyps  / Family history  / Inherited syndromes (Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis) / Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn disease and colitis) / Race (African-Americans)  / Diet high in fat and red meat, low in fiber  / Obesity / Smoking ​ / Alcohol abuse.

GASTRIC CANCER

 

Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and is more common in Asia, South America, and Eastern Europe. The disorder occurs up to 2.5 times more often in men than in women. GC is rarely found in patients younger than 40 years. Most GCs occur sporadically, whereas 8% to 10% have an inherited familial component. GC often produces no specific symptoms and therefore diagnosis is often delayed. Patients may exhibit anorexia and weight loss (95%) as well as abdominal pain that is vague and insidious in nature. GC is highly preventable by avoiding smoking and keeping a healthy lifestyle. Treatment depends on the stage of GC and overall health condition and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted drugs.
GC risk factors: Older age / Gender (male) / Helicobacter pylori infections / Diet high in salted, pickled or smoked food  / Eating foods contaminated with aflatoxin fungus  / Type A blood  / Pernicious anemia  / Family history  / Smoking  / Obesity  / Lynch syndrome  / Asbestos exposure.

 

BLADDER CANCER

Bladder cancer affects people mostly after the age of 40; the median age at diagnosis is 73 years. The disorder occurs 3-4 times more often in men than in women. The estimated heritability for bladder cancer is 31%. Bladder cancer can be characterized by non-muscle invasive lesions (60%) and aggressive muscle-invasive lesions (40%) that are mostly associated with a high mortality rate. There are few symptoms to detect this disorder: increased frequency of urination, pain or burning during urination, blood in the urine, and being unable to urinate. The efficacy of treatment depends on the clinical stage and the associated risk factors. Treatment options may include surgery, immunotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.
Bladder cancer risk factors: Smoking / Gender (male) / Ethnicity (Caucasian) / Environmental toxins (arsenic, aromatic amines) / Previous cancer treatment (cyclophosphamide) / Certain diabetes medications (pioglitazone, metformin) / Chronic bladder inflammation / Family history of Lynch syndrome.

PROSTAD CANCER

 

Prostate cancer (PC) is mainly localized in the male prostate (the gland that produces seminal fluid). Early detection of PC may allow a better chance for successful treatment. The incidence of PC is increased in industrialized countries and accounts for 9.7% of all cancers in men worldwide (15.3% in developed and 4.3% in developing countries). The mean age of patients with PC is 72-74 years. PC has a long latency period, varying from 5 to 15 years. Population-wide studies have estimated that heritability of PC is 43%. Studies of 40 populations have shown that PC is positively associated with diets that include a high intake of fat, red meat, and dairy products. Treatment options include radiation therapy, hormonal treatment, surgery, cryosurgery, chemotherapy. For a very early stage and asymptomatic PC, the immediate treatment may not be needed; regular follow-ups are recommended to monitor PC progression.
PC risk factors: Older age  / Race (African American) / Family history of prostate or breast cancer  / T2D  / Smoking.
 

BASAL CELL CARCINOMA

 

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common type of skin cancer, is characterized by slow growth, localization, and a very rare metastatic rate, less than 0.1%. Various epidemiological studies have found sun exposure as the main environmental trigger of BCC. The incidence rate of BCC is higher in places with increased sun exposure levels, e.g. equator and northern territories of Australia. Sun exposure (UV light) is associated with cancer due to the ability of UV radiation to induce direct mutations of DNA. According to the population-based analyses, estimated genetic factors account for 7.7%. Mortality of BCC is low, but the malignancy of disorder is associated with lifetime healthcare costs. Treatment depends on the size, type, depth, and location of cancer and may include freezing, surgery, cryotherapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, photodynamic therapy, etc.
BCC risk factors: Excessive sun exposure  / Tanning devices  / Fair skin, light hair and eye color  / Older age  / Viral infections / Immunosuppression  / Psoriasis treated with psoralen + UVA ​Radiotherapy.

 

MELANOMA

 

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer, affecting melanocytes (cells producing skin pigment melanin). Melanoma may also occur in eyes, and rarely in intestines. Although it accounts for only 4% of all skin cancer types, it causes 80% of skin cancer deaths. If the condition is recognized and treated early, it is almost always curable. There is a broad spectrum of protection strategies. Doctors recommend sun avoidance between 10 am and 4 pm. When sun cannot be avoided, use sun protective clothing and sunscreens with SPF of 15 and higher. Total avoidance of artificial UV sources is highly advised. Treatment depends on the size, stage, and location of cancer. Early-stage melanoma is removed by biopsy; for spreading melanoma, surgery is used to remove affected lymph nodes. Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, biological therapy, and targeted therapy may be also used.
Melanoma risk factors: Sunlight overexposure  / Tanning devices  / Gender and age (female under 40, male over 40) ​​ / Family history ​​ / Melanocytic nevi (unusual moles).

WELLNESS//

 

The secret to living healthier, longer, and more athletic is on the Genetic Passport's Wellness test panel.! What is in our Genetic Passport Wellness test panel based on molecular DNA analysis of 68 gene regions?

GENETIC PREDISPOSITIONS 

 

 1) Immune System

 2) Atrial fibrillation (AF)

 3) Coronary artery disease (CAD)

 4) Intracranial aneurysm (IA)

 5) Peripheral arterial disease (PAD)

 6) Venous thromboembolism (VTE)

 7) Obesity

 8) Type 1 diabetes

 9) Type 2 diabetes

10) Hyperthyroidism

11) Folate Metabolism

12) Gluten Intolerance

13) Lactose Intolerance

14) Sugar Consumption

15) Alzheimer

16) Osteoporosis

17) Rheumatoid arthritis

18) Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG)

19) Exfoliating glaucoma

20) Age-related macula degeneration (AMD)

21) Vitamine B12 

22) Vitamine B6

23) Vitamine D

24) Sports Performance

REPORTING

 

 

●Determining the most common 24 genetic disease risks in the world in numerical rates.

 

●Comparing personal risks with population risks numerically.

 

●Separate disclosure of the measures required to reduce the genetic and environmental risk rates for each disease.

 

●Explanation of the trigger factors one by one according to the risk rate for each disease.

 

●Descriptive information of all environmental factors necessary to minimize or even eliminate risks by risk rate for each disease.

 

●Nutritional and exercise recommendations for each disease.

 

●Emergency response warning against high-risk rates.

 

●Assessing the possibility of increased risk after the interaction of other genetic regions despite the low risk of disease.

 

●Assessing the possibility of decreasing the risk after the interaction of other genetic regions despite the high risk of disease.

GENETIC PASSPORT® CHECK-UP //

 

INTRODUCING THE WORLD'S MOST ADVANCED DNA TEST.

Genetic Check-Up based on molecular DNA analysis of 150 gene regions. Genetic Passport determines the risks of nearly 40 genetic diseases, ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's, sports performance to obesity, and diabetes.

GENETIC PREDISPOSITIONS

1) Breast Cancer (BC)

2) Lung Cancer (LC)

3) Colorectal Cancer (CC)

4) Gastric Cancer (GC)

5) Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

6) Bladder Cancer

7) Prostate Cancer (PC)

8) Melanoma

9) Atrial fibrillation (AF)

10) Coronary artery disease (CAD)

11) Intracranial aneurysm (IA)

12) Peripheral arterial disease (PAD)

13) Venous thromboembolism (VTE)

14) Obesity

15) Type 1 diabetes

16) Type 2 diabetes

17) High blood pressure

18) Hyperthyroidism

19) Folate Metabolism

20) Gluten Intolerance

21) Lactose Intolerance

22) Sugar Consumption

23) Alzheimer

24) Osteoporosis

25) Multiple Sclerosis (MS),

26) Migraine with Aura

27) Psoriasis

28) Rheumatoid arthritis

29) The systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

30) Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG)

31) Exfoliating glaucoma

32) Age-related macula degeneration (AMD)

33) Vitamine B12 

34) Vitamine B6

35) Vitamine D

36) ACTN'3 (R577X)

37) ACE (I/D) 

ANALYZED GENE REGIONS

 

Alzheimer disease APOE 
Alzheimer disease APOE 
Atrial fibrillation 4q25 
Atrial fibrillation PITX2 
Basal cell carcinoma PADI6  rs7538XXX 
Basal cell carcinoma Intergenic  rs801XXX 
Bladder cancer TACC3 
Bladder cancer MYC
Breast cancer TP53 
Breast cancer RAD51B 
Breast cancer ATM rs1800XXX
Breast cancer ATM rs1800XXX 
Breast cancer ATM rs1800XXX 
Breast cancer ATM rs1801XXX 
Breast cancer ATM rs3092XXX 
Breast cancer ATM rs3218XXX
Breast cancer ATM rs3218XXX 
Breast cancer TNRC9 
Breast cancer BRCA1 

Breast cancer ATM  
Breast cancer BRCA1 rs80357XXX 
Breast cancer BRCA2 
Celiac disease HLA-DQA1  
Celiac disease HLA-DRA  
Celiac disease Intergenic rs4639XXX
Celiac disease Intergenic rs4713XXX
Celiac disease Intergenic rs7454XXX 
Celiac disease HLA-DQB1  
Colorectal cancer SMAD7 
Colorectal cancer Intergenic rs4779XXX 
Colorectal cancer SMAD7 
Colorectal cancer Intergenic rs6983XXX 
Colorectal cancer TCF7L2 
Coronary artery disease LPA 
Coronary artery disease CDKN2B-AS1 
Coronary artery disease Intergenic rs10757XXX 
Coronary artery disease CDKN2B-AS1 rs2383XXX
Coronary artery disease CDKN2B-AS1 rs2383XXX 
Coronary artery disease LPA 
Exfoliating glaucoma LOXL1 

Exfoliating glaucoma LOXL1 rs3825XXX 
Folate Metabolism MTHFR 
Gallstone disease ABCG8 rs11887XXX 
Gastric cancer MTHFR rs1801XXX 
Graves' disease IL-23R rs10889XXX
Graves' disease TNF-α rs1800XXX
Graves' disease TNF-α rs1800XXX
Graves' disease IL-23R rs2201XXX 
Graves' disease IL-23R rs7530XXX 
Intracranial aneurysm SOX17 rs10958XXX 
Intracranial aneurysm CDKN2A/CDKN2B 
Lactose intolerance MCM6 rs4988XXX 
Lung cancer CHRNA3 rs1051XXX 
Lung cancer HYKK rs8034XXX 
Lung cancer CHRNA5 rs951XXX 
Male pattern baldness Intergenic  
Male pattern baldness Intergenic rs6625XXX  
Melanoma MC1R rs1805XXX
Migraine with aura MTHFR rs1801XXX 
Multiple sclerosis ILR2A
Multiple sclerosis HLA-DRA

Multiple sclerosis IL7R rs6897XXX
Obesity MC4R
Obesity MC4R 
Obesity APOA2 
Obesity PCSK1
Obesity APOA5 
Obesity SH2B1 
Osteoporosis LRP5 rs3736228
Osteoporosis LRP5 rs4988321 
Peripheral arterial disease CHRNA5
Primary open-angle glaucoma SIX1 
Primary open-angle glaucoma ATOH7
Primary open-angle glaucoma CAV1-CAV2  
Primary open-angle glaucoma TMCO1 
Prostate cancer FUNDC2P2 
Prostate cancer Intergenic rs16901XXX
Prostate cancer CASC17 
Prostate cancer Intergenic
Psoriasis TNF-α 
Psoriasis LCE3D 

Rheumatoid arthritis TRAF1 
Rheumatoid arthritis Intergenic rs6457617 
Rheumatoid arthritis STAT4 
Sugar consumption SLC2A2 
Systemic lupus erythematosus STAT4 
Systemic lupus erythematosus IRF5 
Systemic lupus erythematosus ITGAM  
Systemic lupus erythematosus TNF-a  
Systemic lupus erythematosus HLA-DQA1 
Systemic lupus erythematosus SKIV2L  
Systemic lupus erythematosus STAT4 
Systemic lupus erythematosus ITGAM 
Type 1 diabetes PTPN22 
Type 1 diabetes CLEC16A 
Type 1 diabetes STAT4 
Type 1 diabetes HLA-DQA1 
Type 2 diabetes CDKN2B 
Type 2 diabetes Intergenic 
Type 2 diabetes TCF7L2 
Type 2 diabetes SLC30A8 
Type 2 diabetes PPARG

Type 2 diabetes TCF7L2 
Type 2 diabetes Intergenic 
Type 2 diabetes Intergenic 
Type 2 diabetes FTO rs9939XXX 
Venous thromboembolism F2 rs1799XXX
Venous thromboembolism F5
Vitamin B12 FUT2 
Vitamin B6 ALPL 
Vitamin D CYP2R1 
Vitamin D CYP2R1 
Vitamin D GC 
Vitamin D GC 

Muscle type ACTN3 

Cardiyac capacity ACE 

REPORTING

 

 

●Determining the most common 40 genetic disease risks in the world in numerical rates.

 

●Comparing personal risks with population risks numerically.

 

●Separate disclosure of the measures required to reduce the genetic and environmental risk rates for each disease.

 

●Explanation of the trigger factors one by one according to the risk rate for each disease.

 

●Descriptive information of all environmental factors necessary to minimize or even eliminate risks by risk rate for each disease.

 

●Nutritional and exercise recommendations for each disease.

 

●Emergency response warning against high-risk rates.

 

●Assessing the possibility of increased risk after the interaction of other genetic regions despite the low risk of disease.

 

●Assessing the possibility of decreasing the risk after the interaction of other genetic regions despite the high risk of disease.

© COPYRIGHT 2020 GENETIC PASSPORT